An Icy Beginning


Snowy Tree

Snowy tree in our front yard on Thanksgiving day 2015.

As I write this, we are at 19 degrees with freezing fog, after a snow storm that dumped another 5 inches on my town.  We have not been without snow on the ground since Thanksgiving.  Here in Colorado, you would assume that is pretty normal.  But I don’t live in the mountains (although one day I hope to), and our weather is usually pretty up and down.  We can be above 60 degrees on any given morning, with sunny skies, and have snow by mid-afternoon and drop into the single digits by nightfall.  Weather is so unpredictable here that forecasts aren’t really good for more than 36 hours out.

And you would think I would be upset with all this snow and cold.  But I love it.  I was a born and raised Midwestern girl, but I always longed for the snow-peaked Rocky Mountains.  When I had the opportunity to move here at age 50, you can bet I didn’t look back.  And snow and cold in winter means I can slow down and spend more time writing or crafting or cooking, three things I love to do.  There is no gardening or outside work, and our social calendar has gone to great emptiness since the holidays.  Winter is quiet, encouraging one to be introspective and thoughtful.

And as a writer, it means I may get time to be inspired.  To write more.  To catch up on some research or read an extra book or two.  Or, to come up with new ideas for stories.

What if my heroine and hero were forced together by an ice or snow storm?  What kind of trouble could they get into if there was no power because of downed lines, trapped in a single room of a cabin where a wood stove could keep them warm?  And needing to replenish the firewood supply, what if they were to run into an angry, hungry, sleep-deprived bear?  What if they knew each other before, parting on less-than-ideal terms and having some hard feelings about how that whole thing went down?

I have read some books set in winter, that trapped the hero and heroine together in an icy or snowy situation.  They had to make do, and stay away from the bad guy, in one of the books.  They had to make do, and while they made do they had plenty of time to think about themselves and each other, to fall in love, to work together to find a solution.

My brain has been playing around with such a story.  And I think my brain is having more fun with this than usual, because of our current icy, snowy conditions here.  Not that that is a bad thing, right?  I’ll take inspiration where I can get it.

Unlike some other writers, it is really hard for me to write about a particular time of year, say, a holiday or hot summer or cold winter, unless I’m actually experiencing that thing myself.  It’s hard to be inspired to write a Christmas story, for example, when it is the middle of June and I’m picking green beans in my garden and getting a sunburn.

So, since my current WIP is floundering, perhaps I’ll drag that ice-storm story out and give it a go.  For a while, anyway.  Until the sun comes back out and gives us some warmth and melting of snow, and then I can get back to the summer story I’ve been working on.

What are you working on in these cold, dark months?  Tell me about it in the comments!

I Think I’m a Grown Up


alarm clockMost days, I feel like a grown-up.  You know, paying bills, working a day J.O.B., keeping a house maintained, remembering to pick up milk, getting the laundry done, scheduling oil changes for the car, and making my own doctor’s appointments.  After all, I’ve been doing this stuff for somewhere around 35 years or so.  I should have this stuff down pat.

I’m known for keeping a calm head in panic situations, and in fact, people rely on me to maintain that level of calm through any stressful or crisis situations.  I have been this way all my life, even when I was a teenager.  It isn’t until later, when I am alone and out of the crisis situation, that I can allow my internal panic alarm to activate and work its way out of my system.  No one ever really knows.

But as a writer, I don’t always feel much like a grownup.  I am constantly worried about whether people will like what I’ve written, feeling seriously aggrieved when there is criticism or requests for editing.  I am often paralyzed by this fear, sitting with my fingers over the keyboard unable to write a single word that doesn’t sound awful in my head. No one is going to like it.  My editor is going to scratch it out with a red pen.  Worse, my publisher will not buy it.  I am a loser.

That panic keeps me from being productive when I should be being productive.  As I head into a new year, with the same goals from last year (finish the damned manuscript!), I don’t feel any more capable than I did last year.   There has been no magic switch.

But as a grownup, I know how to fix it, or at least, how to attempt to fix it.  When I feel incapable, I know much of it is because I feel like I don’t know enough.  I know enough to panic, but not enough to actually move forward.  So this first month of the year will be mostly about getting my crap together, boosting my skills, and learning as much as I can before I dive back into the current story, with the hope of finishing it.

I definitely have my work cut out for me.  As I pointed out last week, I have a few things I’m working on, and will be trying.  Today I will get my big white board out and see what I can do about that whole goal/motivation/conflict thing for my characters.  My writing journal, where I will record my successes and failures about writing every day, is ready to go.

Now, let’s just see if I can act like a grown up and get this thing done! 🙂

As always, I’m happy to hear your comments, suggestions, helpful tips, smacks to the head, whatever it takes to get me going on my goals!

 

Fairest of the Faire – available now!

Fairest of the Faire book coverBlurb:

Schoolteacher Connie Meyers is suddenly a young widow, her husband killed in a horrific car accident. Heartbroken to find out he had gambled away everything they had, she moves to her sister-in-law’s Midwest home to rebuild her life. A trip to the local Renaissance Faire with her nieces leads to a summer job as a costumed storyteller.

Avowed bad boy and fair performer Gage Youngblood is infatuated with Connie at first sight. Despite his deliberately commitment-free life, and Connie’s don’t-touch-me attitude, he soon has her in his arms, realizing quickly she is also in his heart.

When she is threatened by her late husband’s bookie, he steps into the role of protector, his fate forever sealed with hers.

Available NOW!

Buy at Wild Rose Press:  (eBook and paperback)

Buy at Amazon (Kindle and paperback)

Buy at Barnes and Noble (Nook)

A Writer’s New Year’s Resolution


Happy New Year!How has this year gone by already?  As I get older, they really seem to move much more quickly than when I was young.

I think the end of the year, and the beginning of a new one, are a great time to look back at missed opportunities and decide how the new year should change things.  Sometimes this is on a personal level, and sometimes on a professional level.  Because I’m a Gemini, and there are multiple facets to me, setting resolutions and goals can be problematic.  Which facet needs the most work?  Or do they all need it?  And how do you balance that all out?

In the past, I would set resolutions like, I need to read four books a month.  I have way less time to read than I’d like, and making a resolution forced me to make choices and choose reading instead of something else.  Other years, it was health-related.  Eat healthier, get rid of convenience foods, give up fast foods, work out more.  Sometimes, it was even more personal.  “Be nicer to people.”

Were they successful? To a degree, like anything else.  It’s what you put into it.  I don’t regret any, and there were some I did better than others.  This year, I’m shifting a bit.  I’m looking at it from a goal perspective.  What is the one thing I want to accomplish this year, above all the other things?  What one thing is it that will keep me driven, on track, and moving forward?  And what about all the goals that aren’t quite as pressing?  Do I include them too?

As a writer, I know to take it down to its base, it’s simplest form.  And that’s what I have done.  I have one goal.  Just one.  And I’m talking about it here to help keep my honest and focused on that goal.

I will finish my current WIP and get it submitted to my publisher in hopes of getting a contract.  Before the end of the year.  It has been over a year since I signed the contract for Fairest of the Faire.  I had hoped I’d get book number two finished and submitted by the same time this year (September).  It didn’t happen.  Then I thought I would at least get through the first rough draft by the end of NaNoWriMo (November).  It didn’t happen. I  still have a beginning, and an end.  I have no middle.  None.  I have piddled around hoping that inspiration would strike, that a middle would present itself.  It hasn’t.  And waiting for it is not going to help.

I have several tools at my ready disposal, including a book on conflict, goals, and motivation, a screen writing book that purports to help with saggy middles, a Deal a Story card deck that is supposed to help nail down plot fillers, and a big white board to plot on.  I need to do this thing.  I need to buckle down, use the tools, and get this thing written.  It’s a great story.  Or, it will be if I ever get it done!

To that end, I pledge to write every single day in 2016.  Blog posts and Twitter jabs do not count.  Neither do emails, or the writing I do with my day J.O.B.  I can only write on my novel.  I have the tools.  I have the time.  Inspiration or not, I need to do this thing.

What are your resolutions for the new year?  What are your words of wisdom and encouragement as I head into 2016?  Tell me in the comments!

 

Fairest of the Faire – available now!

Fairest of the Faire book coverBlurb:

Schoolteacher Connie Meyers is suddenly a young widow, her husband killed in a horrific car accident. Heartbroken to find out he had gambled away everything they had, she moves to her sister-in-law’s Midwest home to rebuild her life. A trip to the local Renaissance Faire with her nieces leads to a summer job as a costumed storyteller.

Avowed bad boy and fair performer Gage Youngblood is infatuated with Connie at first sight. Despite his deliberately commitment-free life, and Connie’s don’t-touch-me attitude, he soon has her in his arms, realizing quickly she is also in his heart.

When she is threatened by her late husband’s bookie, he steps into the role of protector, his fate forever sealed with hers.

Available NOW!

Buy at Wild Rose Press:  (eBook and paperback)

Buy at Amazon (Kindle and paperback)

Buy at Barnes and Noble (Nook)

Why Do I Write an Alpha Male Hero?


picture of a man's face, with blue eyesI unashamedly use alpha male characters in my novels.  In some circles, it might be considered a type of trope, although I’m not sure I’d classify it that way.  But my heroes are always alpha, and my heroines not so much so.  Not that they are totally incapable, because I hate nothing more than a whiny, incapable woman.  I just like the idea of an alpha male. There is an intensity there, a drive, a need for accomplishment, that appeals to me.  And there’s a reason for that, as you will see below.

An alpha male is a decision-maker.  He knows what he wants, and he knows how to get there.  An alpha male can be a Type-A personality, and often times is.  He is also a protector.  His woman, when he finally realizes she is his woman, will want for nothing, and will not come to any harm.  If she does come to harm, the alpha male’s guilt will be almost tangible.

Many times, an alpha male will be in charge of the relationship and the progression of the relationship.  He will be the one pushing for physical intimacy, the one hovering and not being able to stay away.  It can appear that the heroine is simply pushed/pulled into the relationship, overwhelmed by the power of the alpha male.  She cannot resist.  He is the guy who will save her, who will make everything right, who will fulfill all her dreams.

And nothing could be further from the truth.  Part of the arc of an alpha-male story line is the hero realizing that their Type-A tendencies are easily moderated and softened by the heroine, who ultimately has complete control over the relationship.  Her acquiescence is a control she exerts, in a conscious or unconscious way, to bring the hero to where she wants him to be.  Put simply, she saves his life by easing the burden of the Type-A behavior, and bringing him to a realization that their relationship is more equal than he ever imagined.  In the end, the heroine becomes the dominant, while the flummoxed and discomfited hero learns to adjust.

How do I know all of this?  I am a Type-A.  I scored a solid ESTJ on the Myers-Briggs even when I was in college, and confirmed in several re-takings over the years.  Another personality assessment I recently took as part of my work, called a DiSC, confirmed the same thing.  I am not particularly ambitious, but I’m a control freak in so many things that I sometimes find it difficult to relax.  It is my way or the highway, and I can blow up pretty easily in the right situations.  I spend much of my work day (at the day J.O.B.) alternately pushing projects forward, even if I have to do it myself (I do delegate, but certain things are never delegated, because, “only I can do them the way they need to be done”), or fretting over something I perceive as a missed deadline or project failure.  This is the stress and reality of a Type-A.

When I create an alpha male hero, he is me.  He is me in so many ways, and I know how to crack him open and lay him vulnerable, split from stem to stern.  I know, because I know what it would take to make me vulnerable.  Writing the alpha male is easy for me.  Writing the heroine who is his counter is much harder.  I don’t like a weak woman, so I have to balance the desire the alpha male has for the non-dominant woman, and then help them both switch places throughout the course of the book.

It is, for me, a win-win.  Every time.

Are your heroes alpha males?  Or do you go for a different type?  Let me know in the comments!

Because I Don’t Give a &%*#


Baby covering its ears and cryingOkay, bear with me here.  It’s not what you think. Really.

Has anyone besides me noticed the ramped up use of the F-word in everything from Facebook memes to the titles of books to television shows?  I think I first noticed it a couple of years ago, but it has seemed to have gotten extreme.  There are now popular books out there with this word in the title, lots of memes floating around, and it just has gotten to the point where I can’t go more than a few minutes online without seeing it.  That being said, I still don’t think I’ve been desensitized to the word, and it bothers me almost every time I see it.

Not that I haven’t used that word in appropriate conversations.  I think many of us have.  And I am by no means a prude.  I write erotic romance, for goodness’ sake.  I have described things in my books that would make people blush.  So that isn’t what bothers me about it.  I think it started out being “edgy” to use the word.  A lot of young bloggers did it, and it sort of caught on.  But it’s not just the young ones doing it now, and it is definitely not “edgy” when everyone is doing it.

I’m a writer.  I make judicious and effective use of words to get my ideas across.  As a writer, the use of the f-word may show that I am uncreative, unimaginative, or lacking in vocabulary.  There may be very specific instances when the f-word is the right word to use, but that should be so rare that the word, when heard, should have a very specific purpose, and create a specific type of feeling or reaction in my reader.  When everything uses the f-word, it loses any effect it might have had in expressing emotions.  Are we really saying what we need to say when the only word we can find to use is the f-word?

I suppose some people have been normalized to it, so it doesn’t bother them the way it does me.  For me, I have not been normalized to it.  It is a specific word to use in very specific situations, but not blanket-used.

So, how do you feel about the use of the word?  I know I have friends who completely disagree with me, but I also can’t justify using the word extensively when I have so many other words to use, which say things with much more detail than one four-letter word.  What do you think?

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner!


National Novel Writing Month Winner 2015Another National Novel Writing Month has come and gone. I wait all year for this event, and poof, suddenly it’s December.  But that’s okay.  If I had to keep up this level of writing and excitement all year long, I’d probably have a stroke!

I will say that I struggled.  I have struggled before to make it, but this seemed worse, some how.  I had high hopes. Such high hopes.  I need to get a second novel done and submitted to my publisher.  But I’m not anywhere near that goal.

The first part of the month, I piddled along, spending more time on my Municipal Liaison duties for my region, and by the end of the third week, I had only 20,000 words written.  I had 8 days to write 30,000 words.  A daunting goal, I know.

But I knuckled down, wrote more than 3,000 words a day, and made my 50K.  I freely admit that 95% of those words are drack, and will be deleted shortly.  Actually, I might not do anything at all with all those words, just pluck out a few decent scenes and set them aside for later use.  Or, what is more likely, I’ll start with the manuscript I had from earlier this year, and build on that.

Fortunately, National Novel Writing Month isn’t about quality.  It’s about proving you can write a lot in one month.  And for the thirteenth year, I proved that I could write a lot in one month.  And that, in itself, is quite an accomplishment.

Now I’m on to December, when a new sort of busy starts to happen.  I keep thinking I’ll finally get to rest, since it is winter.  But so far, that hasn’t been the case.  This weekend, I’m doing a regular Ms. Claus gig with my husband, Santa.  There will likely be other gigs throughout the month, but this is the first of them.  Five hours in wig and big red dress with sharp white apron, smiling at babies and being ignored because I’m not The Big Guy. 🙂  It’s all good.  But it means I’m busy.  Not much writing happens when I’m this busy.  And that makes me sad.

If you did NaNoWriMo in November, how did you do?  Did you get your 50K?  If it was your first time, what was your experience with it?  Tell me in the comments.

Fairest of the Faire – available now!

Fairest of the Faire book coverBlurb:

Schoolteacher Connie Meyers is suddenly a young widow, her husband killed in a horrific car accident. Heartbroken to find out he had gambled away everything they had, she moves to her sister-in-law’s Midwest home to rebuild her life. A trip to the local Renaissance Faire with her nieces leads to a summer job as a costumed storyteller.

Avowed bad boy and fair performer Gage Youngblood is infatuated with Connie at first sight. Despite his deliberately commitment-free life, and Connie’s don’t-touch-me attitude, he soon has her in his arms, realizing quickly she is also in his heart.

When she is threatened by her late husband’s bookie, he steps into the role of protector, his fate forever sealed with hers.

Available NOW!

Buy at Wild Rose Press:  (eBook and paperback)

Buy at Amazon (Kindle and paperback)

Buy at Barnes and Noble (Nook)

 

Hauntings From the Past


The Transitive Vampire Book CoverBear with me…I know it isn’t the haunting season anymore.  Trust me, you’ll like this. 🙂

A couple weeks ago, I was hanging around some of my favorite haunts (aka, all the wonderful thrift stores in my town) and picked up an original 1984 copy of The Transitive Vampire.  It still had the dust cover on it, and the binding had not been cracked.  In other words, brand spanking new, yet older than the college students I work with at my day job.  31 years old, to be exact.  Let’s see…at 31, I was a mom and wife and working a full time day job and a part time evening job.  Kind of like today.  But I digress…

Why I didn’t have this book in my “writing books” collection, I am not sure.  It should have been right there along with Eats, Shoots and Leaves and Bird by Bird. How could I resist buying this book at the thrift store?  It was $2 on half-price day…what a bargain!

I’m going to digress again, here.  Because when I brought this book home, along with lots of other goodies from the thrift store, it sat on the dining room table for the rest of the day.  My husband saw it and said, “Transvestite Vampire?”  I almost fell on the floor laughing.  My husband is not much of a reader, and never a writer, as moving media is more his thing (television).  He saw the first part of “Trans” and went from there.  After I stopped giggling, I told him it was a book on writing.  He wasn’t very impressed.

From a review by Thomas DePietro in 1985:

The deliberately offbeat examples that form the body of this whimsical handbook of grammar may delight readers who savor the postmodern fictions of Borges, Barth, and Barthelme.  But these self-consciously hip sentences risk perpetuating what The Transitive Vampire tacitly acknowledges: many college-educated adults can’t parse a simple sentence.

Thirty years later, I think that is probably still true.  I work with students in higher education every day, and I see it still.  I know writing is somewhat of a talent, but it is also a skill, and needs to be practiced.  I always say essays are easy for me.  And that is true.  I was born with the ability to take a small kernel of information and form an entire treatise around it.  I can do it quickly, and I can do it over and over.  I was that kid in college whose first year comp professor recognized as someone who needed to put in a bit more effort, so she gave me lots of C’s and D’s until I worked as hard on my essays as my classmates.  I didn’t value her judgment of me at the time, but I do now. I needed to develop the innate talent I had to be an effective writer.

As soon as November is over (I’m still in the throes of writing my NaNoNovel), I’m going to be sinking my teeth into The Transitive Vampire.  What a fun read this will be.  I also need to finish How Not to Finish a Novel, which is pretty fun so far with some terrible examples of now NOT to write a novel.

And one more diB Dalton book sticker from 1984version before I go.  How many of you are old enough to remember B. Dalton Books?  Because this book has the original BD sticker on it, including the price.  Talk abut walking back in time! I spent a lot of my paychecks in B. Dalton back in the day.  Did you?

I’d love to hear your writing book suggestions in the comments.  Or your memories of B. Dalton.  Or your fabulous book store finds.

The Holidays Approach…But First, We Give Thanks


Rudolph stuffed animalI include this picture because this is one of my “happy moments.”  We all have them.  Moments where things seemed so perfect, or we got a gift we could have never anticipated, or the food was full of memories and made you feel fat and happy.

This moment was one of the most perfect Christmas mornings I’d ever had.  The townhouse we had rented had a fireplace.  I’d not had a fireplace in any home I’d ever owned.  This one had one, and it worked well.  I bought enough wood to have weekend fires for the entire winter.  We had snow on Christmas eve that year, and woke up to a diamond-sparkled sunny morning.  The air was bitter cold.  But that fireplace – it was roaring with a fire all day long.  The house smelled mildly of wood smoke, and cloves from the sugar glaze on the ham in the oven.  And I go a gift that I had not anticipated – a Build-a-Bear Rudolph, complete with a hat, scarf, and Rudolph slippers.  I have loved Rudolph since I was a little girl and saw it on television (in black and white).  Yes, I’m that old – I got to see the very first broadcast of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

I know, it is not Christmas yet, but we are right on the cusp of it as we approach Thanksgiving here in the United States.  I my memories, Thanksgiving is full of food, and family, and on Friday, we started the decorating.  Thanksgiving is the start of a long, happy, warm season, at least for me.

As we’ve gotten older, and moved away from our childhood homes (in my case, I’ve moved a thousand miles from my childhood home), we make our own new traditions, and spend our Thanksgivings being thankful.  And watching football, of course!  This year, the weather forecast is a bit dreadful – snow is expected, along with blisteringly cold temps.  What better way to spend a cold, snowy day than inside, with a roast turkey, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, hot yeasty rolls, dressing, and PIE?  I can’t think of much!

I am thankful for so many things this year – that we are well-housed, even if it is a rental and there is no fireplace; that we have food in our fridge, freezer, and pantry, some of which I grew myself; that my paycheck is more than enough to pay the bills; that we have wonderful neighbors in this little-town-big-city we live in; that I can see the mountains every single day; that I am healthy, despite some aches and pains and needing glasses to read and having to watch what I eat a bit more carefully; for healthy parents that I can still see and communicate with (even though we are thousands of miles apart); for a kitty who thinks I’m her mommy; for grown children that make me proud, and my middle-schooler who is still figuring it all out.

And I am thankful for my publisher, The Wild Rose Press.  Without them, I could not say I am a published author.  For me, reaching this milestone was never expected, even though I’d been working toward it for many years.  To get that opportunity, to have someone validate my writing by publishing it, has been one of those unexpected, but wonderful things that I will add to my list of thankfuls for many years to come.

Things are never perfect.  There will always be struggles and bumps in the road and mountains of obstacles.  But there are plenty of things that go right.  And plenty of things that go better than right.  I am a thankful woman.

What are you thankful for this year?

A Morning Writer


SunshineI am one of those awful morning people.  Or so I am told by those that aren’t morning people.  I don’t jump out of bed and start making noise and dancing and singing, but I wake up naturally two hours before sunrise, and I get up and do things.  I get up and get dressed and fix my hair and face, and face my day.  On weekdays, I head to my computer, read my email, post requested tweets, check the news, and waste time on facebook, all while drinking a bottle of water.  I might start a load of wash or fold a load of wash, then I fix my lunch, fix my breakfast, and head off to work.  On the weekends, I still wake up early, piddle around on my computer, do a few chores, and by 7 I am at my favorite coffee shop for two dedicated hours of writing before anyone else in the house is awake.

If this sounds boring, well, let’s just say I like my routines.  They keep me on track.  And I like mornings.  Mornings are quiet, filled with the promise of a new day.  A whole blank white board of time exists before me, and I can do many things with that time, if I want to.  I can also choose to do nothing with that time.

What I choose to do with that time is to be active, to knock things off the to-do list, and most importantly, write.  I am awake, feeling good, caffeinated, and ready to go.

I know there are people who can stay up all night, and prefer to sleep through golden dawns and promising mornings.  If I were to “sleep in” (which is actually impossible for me), I would feel like I wasted the most productive, and quietest, time of my day.  That morning time is when the chores don’t call as loud, when there is not such a push to meet a deadline.  It is my time to be productive.

I am often asked, “how do you become a morning person?”  I don’t think you can.  I think you are, or you aren’t.  I have been a morning person all of my life.  My mom talks about how she would want to sleep in on a Saturday, and she couldn’t, because 9 month old me was standing up in the crib singing morning songs to the sun that was pouring through my window.  I was not raised in the country, or on a farm, although my dad and his whole side of the family are rural farm people.  I am very much like him, though.  I cannot remember my father ever still being in bed when I got up in the morning.  He usually beat me by a good hour.  He’d already had his coffee, read the paper, and taken a wander around the yard to see if the moles had been active overnight.  I could tell you about the time he took his .22 pistol out into the yard one early morning and shot a mole that had made the mistake of showing himself above ground, but I’ll save that for another time.

I cannot imagine missing the sun coming up.  I cannot imagine sleeping until the sun is high in the sky.  In fact, I can’t imagine sleeping more than about six hours, either. The older I get, the less sleep I need.  I’m in bed by 11, but not always asleep, and awake at 4 a.m., regardless of how late I stayed up.  Sometimes that is a bit of a curse, but I still wouldn’t trade it for losing my daytime.

So what are you?  A morning person, or a night owl?  Tell me what you like about being either one!

Why Romance?


Candy Heart KeyboardI am asked sometimes, why romance?  Why do I write it, and why do I read it?  Isn’t it silly?  How many ways can we write about falling in love, anyway?  How many love stories can possibly be out there?

As a woman who has gone through more than one romance, I can say that there are a lot of love stories out there.  Not all of them are happily-ever-after, but that’s actually okay.  If you get to fall in love more than once in a lifetime, then you have lived, and loved, a lot.  And don’t we believe we are increased, bettered, by love?  I know I do.

So why NOT romance?  Writing the stories that touch people’s hearts makes me happy.  I like reading happy stories, stories that end in fairy tale romance, so why wouldn’t I like to write them?

As I work on my second book, and struggle through the saggy middle of it, I try to focus on that core love story.  That story is what will keep me (and the writing) going.  Boy meets girl, and falls in love.  Girl is not so sure about boy, as she’s been burned in the past.  But she gives him a chance, then pushes him away, because she is scared.  There is a bad guy, and some messy scenes of the bad guy getting the upper hand, but through it all, the love story runs as a current underneath it all.  In the end, girl can no longer deny that boy has her best interests at heart, and she willingly admits she loves him.  It all ends Happily Ever After.

Real life doesn’t always offer us that, of course.  I’m not living my Happily Ever After, but it’s not over yet, so who knows, right?  Hope springs eternal.  And the escape of a good romantic read can make all the difference in our attitudes and dreams.  If we think anything is possible, then things will always look rosy and promising.  And there’s really nothing wrong with that at all.

What do you like about reading (or writing if you are an author) romance?  Let me know in the comments!

 

Fairest of the Faire – available now!

Fairest of the Faire book coverBlurb:

Schoolteacher Connie Meyers is suddenly a young widow, her husband killed in a horrific car accident. Heartbroken to find out he had gambled away everything they had, she moves to her sister-in-law’s Midwest home to rebuild her life. A trip to the local Renaissance Faire with her nieces leads to a summer job as a costumed storyteller.

Avowed bad boy and fair performer Gage Youngblood is infatuated with Connie at first sight. Despite his deliberately commitment-free life, and Connie’s don’t-touch-me attitude, he soon has her in his arms, realizing quickly she is also in his heart.

When she is threatened by her late husband’s bookie, he steps into the role of protector, his fate forever sealed with hers.

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