The Blessing and the Curse of Reviews


I am a debut author.  I have one book out, with a smattering of reviews, most good.  In fact, I’ve not gotten anything less than a four star review for my novel, both on Goodreads and Amazon.  Many of those reviews came as part of a review tour, rather than people stumbling upon my book by accident.  And I am grateful for those reviews, for sure.

But I also have come to understand that having a handful of reviews means nothing in today’s publishing world.  Amazon doesn’t notice until you have fifty or so.  Until then, I’m just invisible.  Which is probably as it should be for a new author.  I am no J.K. Rowling.

Reviews, I think, can be a blessing and a curse.  The struggle to get them is a curse – it is hard to do, and can become an obsession.  When you get a less-than-stellar review, that can wound.  But if you get several less-than-stellar reviews, it might actually mean that your work is not up to par.  That can really set you back, because it can indicate that you need to make some changes in how you write.  Some low reviews can, of course, just be from someone who wasn’t into your genre or didn’t like your cover or didn’t like your main character.  That is always going to happen, and you can probably move on from those and not worry about the larger impact of a string of poor reviews.

But how much stock, really, should we put into reviews we get on our books?  It is fairly well known that I am not a fan of Nora Roberts, who writes in my genre.  I’m not alone, as I’ve read some really low reviews of her work.  Does anyone think that Nora Roberts really cares about the negative reviews all that much?  Does she read them and sob into her cup of tea over them, the way a lesser-known or thinner-skinned author might?  Somehow, I think she doesn’t really care about reviews, and probably rarely reads them or follows them.  After all, she is a prolific writer, and if she was wasting her time reading all the reviews and agonizing over the negative ones, she wouldn’t have the time or energy to write.

So I believe she keeps chugging along writing her novels, because it doesn’t really matter if they are good or not, or people buy them or not, because she’s still going to make money from the people that are her fans.  The only difference between her and I is that she has millions of fans.  I have like, three, and two of those are family.  It’s all relative, right?

I’ve purposely stopped looking at my reviews.  If I get one, and it’s good, that’s great, but I am not going to put all my emotional energy into worrying about the reviews.  I’d rather be writing my next book.  I don’t feel like the good outweighs the bad when it comes to reviews.  And I think it’s wasted energy to spend time on them.

As an author, what do you think?  How important are reviews to you and why?  Leave me your thoughts in a comment!

 

Fairest of the Faire – available now!

Fairest of the Faire book coverBlurb:

Schoolteacher Connie Meyers is suddenly a young widow, her husband killed in a horrific car accident. Heartbroken to find out he had gambled away everything they had, she moves to her sister-in-law’s Midwest home to rebuild her life. A trip to the local Renaissance Faire with her nieces leads to a summer job as a costumed storyteller.

Avowed bad boy and fair performer Gage Youngblood is infatuated with Connie at first sight. Despite his deliberately commitment-free life, and Connie’s don’t-touch-me attitude, he soon has her in his arms, realizing quickly she is also in his heart.

When she is threatened by her late husband’s bookie, he steps into the role of protector, his fate forever sealed with hers.

Available NOW!

Buy at Wild Rose Press:  (eBook and paperback)

Buy at Amazon (Kindle and paperback)

Buy at Barnes and Noble (Nook)

A Clear Head


Trees in Seaport Village, San DiegoI apologize for the lack of a post last week, but I was visiting beautiful San Diego, California.  It was a work thing for my day J.O.B., which means I was stuck inside most of the day.  But since Daylight Savings Time was in effect, I had two hours of sunshine to enjoy after each day’s activities.  I’m not one of those that goes to the after-conference gatherings to drink and socialize.  I’m much happier going out and taking a walk, sitting and enjoying the scenery or people-watching (doesn’t every author engage in people watching?), and decompressing for the day with a good book.

Something about traveling for my job, not only do I get to learn new things and network with colleagues from all over the country, but I get a lot of “thinking” time.  And thinking time can usually mean working on my novel in my head.

And I did a lot of that last week.  As I struggle with making my characters real, and building a story that gives those characters something to do, that thinking time is exactly what I need.  When I’m home, there is laundry, meals to be cooked, the television is blaring in the other room, my daughter may be (badly) practicing her flute.  There are phone calls to make, bills to pay, floors to mop, gardens to weed… One would think I could do some thinking while folding a load of warm towels fresh from the dryer, but apparently not.  I’m usually thinking about the next chore that needs to be done.

Away from home, my only concern is where I’m going to have dinner that night, and what time I should go to bed in order to be up at a reasonable hour the next morning for my next session.  No cleaning, no bed-making, no meal preparation.  Easy-peasy.

So my brain wanders off a lot.  What if the purposely distanced father decides he wants to have more to do with the daughter he abandoned all those years ago?  What if my artist heroine shows her obsession with the hero, the guy she has known most of her life, by putting his face in every mural she paints around town?  And that hero, a butcher, but also a musician, what would happen if he could hear the ghost that the heroine hears?  How would he react, and what would he do about it?  And could he give up his learned career to make music instead?

Plenty of puzzle pieces there to work with.  But with thinking time, those puzzle pieces are slowly falling into place.  Not forced, but by shaking everything out and seeing where it lands.  The puzzle pieces that don’t fit are slowly being discarded into the bag of Ideas For Another Novel.  As the puzzle pieces fall into place, a path becomes clear for me to write that story.

If you’re a working mom, how do you find your “thinking time?”  Do you fight with your puzzle pieces the way I do?  Tell me about it in the comments!

Oh, and just for your amusement…apparently this week one of the boats on the San Diego Pier lost control and crashed. I’m posting a video of it below.  This is the same place I was last week, and one of the boats in the background of the video (the Cabrille that you can see just to the right as the Hornblower is coming in fast) is the ferry boat I would take between the mainland and Coronado Island during the week.  Kinda scary stuff!